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WHAT TO EXPECT FROM THE THERAPIST?

By implementing effective psychotherapy methods to instill self-understanding among patients and encourage them to adopt new attitudes and feelings towards life situations. It is essential to keep in mind that therapy is not a magic pill or a quick fix: therapy is a healing process that necessitates participation and investment from the patient and caretaker alike. But in the end, making small changes to self-defeating behavior and coping with feelings of sadness, fear, and pain can bring life-altering results.

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WHAT DO YOU NEED TO PREPARE?

1. Think of what you expect from therapy.
2. Write down your expectation from your therapist.
3. Prepare a range of topics you'd like cover in your first session.
4. Reserve your time for the first session.
5. Make a list of medicine you are taking.
6. Go in there ready to be honest and relaxed.

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WHAT WILL THE FIRST MEETING BE LIKE?

The therapist will first start the session by assessing and understanding what the difficulties are you facing. The therapist will then talk to you about your concerns and ask questions about how you think and feel.  At last, the therapist will also explain how therapy works and will plan for future therapy sessions.

WILL EVERYTHING BE KEPT CONFIDENTIAL?

In most circumstances, yes. A significant part of establishing trust with your therapist is confidentiality. There are several exceptions to this, however, which make it necessary for the therapist to practice responsibly.

One example where the confidentiality of a client could be breached is if your therapist is concerned that you're at serious risk of harming yourself or someone else, they may need to inform your GP, a healthcare professional or someone else. 

Another example according to BACP:

A counsellor cannot be legally bound to confidentiality about a crime. Courts have concluded that it is defensible to breach confidence, in good faith, in order to assist the prevention or detection of a serious crime. Good faith requires honesty and reasonable grounds for suspecting or knowing about a crime. 

For more details please refer to: 

https://www.bacp.co.uk/media/6305/bacp-managing-confidentiality-legal-resource-gpia014-july2019.pdf